Skidmore High School Class of 1912

As graduation season approaches, we remember the Skidmore, Missouri High School class of 1912 and their classmates, thanks to these photos from the Skidmore New Era edition of April 25, 1912, page 1.  We believe the photographs may have been taken by G. C. Ashbrook, Skidmore’s professional photographer.  Click the images for larger versions.

Senior Class Roll.  Helen Hutt, Elmer Howden, Bernice Walker, Frances Montgomery.

Skidmore, Missouri High School class of 1912. Helen Hutt, Elmer Howden, Bernice Walker and Frances Montgomery.

 

Junior Class Roll:  Back row, left to right - Glo Barber, Grace Foster, Ethel Porter, Mabel Sauceman, Beulah Carden, Florence Jordan.  Front row: Burman Wright, Oto Riley, Sumner Aldridge, Cecil Phipps.  Not in picture, Ira Fantz.

Skidmore, Missouri Junior Class of 1912. Back row: Glo Barber, Grace Foster, Ethel Porter, Mabel Sauceman, Beulah Carden, Florence Jordan. Front row: Burman Wright, Oto Riley, Sumner Aldridge, Cecil Phipps. Not pictured, Ira Fantz.

 

Skidmore, Missouri 1912 Sophomore Class Roll:  Top row, left to right -- Jessie Dawson, Edna Hughes, Nola Mitchell, Fannie Devers, Gladys Carr, Zema Vance, Eula Strickler, Lee Strickler.  Second row - John Geyer, Reuben Miller, Deldee Gilliland, Nell Jordan, Ada Foster, Ora Hitchcock, Emerson Hammond, Leslie Sauceman.  Bottom row -- Earl Bodle, Ralston McClain.

Skidmore, Missouri High School Sophomore Class, 1912. Top row, left to right — Jessie Dawson, Edna Hughes, Nola Mitchell, Fannie Devers, Gladys Carr, Zema Vance, Eula Strickler, Lee Strickler. Second row – John Geyer, Reuben Miller, Deldee Gilliland, Nell Jordan, Ada Foster, Ora Hitchcock, Emerson Hammond, Leslie Sauceman. Bottom row — Earl Bodle, Ralston McClain.

 

Skidmore, Missouri High School Freshman Class Roll, 1912.  Top row, left to right: Neal Montgomery, Harold Hutt, Leslie Dawson, Harold James, Adrian Taylor, Lannie Reese, Basil Rodman.  Second row: Carrie Twaddell, Beulah Merritt, Bonnie Hickman, Ella Tracy, Margie Stevens, Lelah Earley.  Lower row: Harry Sewell, Delavan Robbins.

Skidmore, Missouri High School Freshman Class, 1912. Top row, left to right: Neal Montgomery, Harold Hutt, Leslie Dawson, Harold James, Adrian Taylor, Lannie Reese, Basil Rodman. Second row: Carrie Twaddell, Beulah Merritt, Bonnie Hickman, Ella Tracy, Margie Stevens, Lelah Earley. Lower row: Harry Sewell, Delavan Robbins.

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Mr. and Mrs. Roy Albright in Texas

News from old friends in the Skidmore New Era (Skidmore, Missouri), March 28, 1912, page 1:

Letter From Francitas, Texas.

We received the following letter from Mr. and Mrs. Roy Albright, who moved to Francitas, Texas, last fall:

Dear Sirs:

Some of our New Era friends may be glad to know that we are in sunny Texas where grass is six inches high, plenty of garden vegetables for use, potatoes and corn up three inches high and cotton is peeping through the ground.

Roy and his brother-in-law, Ed Long, have in 25 acres of potatoes, 50 acres of corn and 15 acres of cotton.

I am teaching private school here in my home.  Francitas has a public school for Texas text books, but my students are of different northern families, who are here for the winter only.  Each child uses his text books from his home state school.

Both of us are well and enjoy being able to keep our shoulders to the wheel.

 

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Civic Improvement League of Hughes Township, 1912

Skidmore, Missouri had its own efforts to improve the community.  The ladies of the town formed an Improvement Association in 1900 and their efforts were not appreciated by the editor of the Skidmore Standard.  The women of Graham and the surrounding community made a similar effort in 1912, as we see in this report from the April 11 edition of the Skidmore New Era, page 9:

Home Improvement League Organized.

Women of Graham Will Clean Up Town and Township.  Build Hall and Effect Other Such Needed Improvements As Are Desired.

The women of Hughes township met at the Presbyterian church in Graham last Saturday afternoon and organized The Civic Improvement League of Hughes township.  Those present were very much interested and entered into the organization work with enthusiasm.

The officers elected were:  President, Mrs. Walter Freytag; Vice-President, Mrs. John Wilson; Recording Secretary, Mrs. Frank L. Miller; Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. Clyde C. Trapp; Treasurer, Mrs. Ed Geyer.

The plan is to organize each school district into a committee, and for this purpose the following chairmen were elected to act in their respective districts:  Hickory Grove, Mrs. Mart Moody; Liberty, Mrs. Chas. Lawrence;  Elkhorn, Mrs. Fred Crawford; East Star, Mrs. Gaylord Dilts; Highland, Miss Minnie Fox; Morgan, Mrs. John Neil; Lyle, Mrs. Sam Lyle; Stark, Mrs. Valentine Ham; Barnes, Mrs. Jim Miller; Hazel Dell, Mrs. George McNeil; Hazlett, Mrs. Stoughton Hazlett; Miller, Mrs. Allen McNeal; Singery, Mrs. Jeff Elliot; Graham, Mrs. John Crawford.

The first work to be taken up by the League will be that of “cleaning up” the township, and building a township hall.  The first will be done by clearing the public highways of weeds, old broken down farm machinery, dragging the roads, clearing out dumping grounds along the roads and etc.  The Township board will cooperate with the League in this work.  Also in Graham, the streets and alleys will be cleared of old tin cans and other rubbish which, at present, gives it anything but a flattering appearance.

Grasses will be planted on vacant lots and along the roadsides where weeds hitherto have grown, trees planted where necessary.  The Town Board will cooperate with the League in making Graham the cleanest and neatest town in the county.  And why should not Hughes township stand first in the county, if not first in the state for good roads, civic improvements and civic righteousness.

Next but not least in importance is the building of a Township Hall.  A building of this kind has long been needed.  There is at present no place to hold a public meeting of any kind, no place to hold elections, political speaking, a lecture course, temperance meetings, musicals or entertainments of any kind, rural and town commencements and other school entertainments. Surely the need is evident.

Another thing is if we do not provide clean educational entertainment for our young people, it is our fault if they seek entertainment elsewhere and along lines that do not meet our approval.

The plans of building the Hall is this:  Shares will be sold and a stock company organized, and then by your vote help manage and control it.  The par value of a share will be $5.

Every woman in the township is cordially invited to become a member of the Civic Improvement League.  Come let us all join hands and work together for all that will beautify and make this community a better place in which to live.

A meeting of the Executive Board of the Civic Improvement League will meet at the home of Mrs. Frank Miller, Saturday, April 13, at 2:30 p.m.  It is hoped all members will be present to help formulate plans for the furtherance of our work.

 

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The Scourge of Scandal

The Nodaway Forum told it like it was, and the Skidmore New Era (Skidmore, Missouri) reprinted it in its April 4, 1907 edition on page 8.  Preach, Nodaway Forum, preach!

The Scourge of Scandal.

Why does dirty scandal taste so sweet to the average tongue?  Why does a good citizen repeat the vile story that stains the mantle of purity?  Why will a Christian follower prostitute his tongue with tales unfit for a stable boy or saloon janitor?

Just the other day every tongue in the city was wagging at the misfortune of a sweet young girl of Nodaway county.  Her unfortunate affair was a jest on every tongue.  Men laughed at her, women scoffed at her, the world condemned her.

No one heard a word of condemnation for the rascal who deserted her.  No one made an effort to place the responsibility where it rightfully belonged.  All the abuse, the ridicule, the calumny were heaped on the helpless, distressed girl.  The church deacons were offended at her and the dear sisters spoke her name with horror.  The neighbors snubbed her.

Why?

This young girl was an innocent, trustful human being who had confidence in all men as she had in her own father.  She had been away from her own fireside but a few times and knew nothing of the deceit, lust and broken promises of a selfish world.  When she was wooed she did not know the gallant knight of her girlish imagination was a lecherous despoiler of virtue.  She did not know this weaver of gilded promises was spinning a new of dishonor to entangle her feet.  She believed all, trusted all and lost all.  She has sinned, but the crime committed against her is greater than hers.

Was the hand of Christian charity extended to her?  Did the deacon with the long prayer and the saintly sister with a long face console her in her days of disgrace and distress?  Have the people with kindness in their hearts defended her?  Have stout hearts sworn to have her despoiler brought to justice that he may face the iron penalties of the law?  Have the homes of decency and the companions of respectability shut him out as they have been swung against her?  Have they, indeed?

How much more is the tongue inclined to wag with the slop of scandal than to raise its voice in loud defence of a helpless and betrayed girlhood!  How much sweeter to chatter with salacious gossip than to protect the good name of womanhood with good silence!  How much better to be charitable and kind and forgiving and helpful than to debase the tongue, the heart and our neighbors with talk that drives innocent victims to despair and the thoughtless speaker to the devil.

— Nodaway Forum.

 

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Bulte’s Best – It’s a Winner

Before Yelp and Amazon and the myriad of other places one can provide reviews of products, there was the local paper.  Check out the testimonials of local Skidmore, Missouri cooks Mrs. S. C. Clark, Mrs. G. W. Devers, Mrs. Reuben Barrett, Mrs. Clyde Barrett, Mrs. David Wright, and Mrs. Mary F. Welton from the April 18, 1907 Skidmore New Era, page 4:

Bulte's Best Flour. It's a Winner. We realize, more than ever, that we have overcome all flour difficulties by buying Bulte's Best. It reigns supreme in many homes in and around Skidmore. Let us place Bulte's Best in your home, with the assurance that it will more than please you and that you will use no other kind but Bulte's Best. Read these testimonials: Bulte's Best makes very fine bread. I heartily recommend it to anyone. Mrs. S. C. Clark. Bulte's Best flour is simply fine. Mrs. G. W. Devers. Bulte's Best flour is superfine. It is the best I have used in many years. Mrs. Reuben Barrett. I have used Bulte's Best flour and can say that it is the best flour I have ever used. Mrs. Clyde Barrett. I have never used a flour just as good as Bulte's Best. Mrs. David Wright. Having used Bulte's Best flour, I consider it excellent for all purposes in family use. I desire nothing better. Mrs. Mary F. Welton. Yours for a Square Deal, Barrett, Stoolfer and Owens.

Bulte’s Best Flour: It’s a Winner. From the April 18, 1907 Skidmore New Era (Skidmore, Missouri), page 4.

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Souvenir with purchase at Mrs. Patton’s Millinery

If you were shopping for your Easter bonnet on this day in 1907, you would surely want to stop by Mrs. J. F. Patton’s millinery shop.  From the April 11, 1907 Skidmore New Era (Skidmore, Missouri):

We lead, others follow!  I carry in stock or can shape anything that will suit your fancy.  I have new goods coming in all the time; therefore I am able to show the latest creations in millinery at the lowest possible price.  A souvenir given with each purchase, Saturday, April 13th.  Respectfully, Mrs. J. F. Patton.  N. B. - If you are not pleased, tell us; if you are, tell others.

From the April 11, 1907 Skidmore New Era (Skidmore, Missouri).

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Good Fences Make Good Neighbors

From the April 11, 1912 Skidmore New Era (Skidmore, Missouri), page 1:

Graham People Fight Over Division Fence.

A. J. Thornton Assaulted by C. E. and Branson Taylor, Friday Morning.  Taylor Arrested and Cave Bond for Appearance at June Court.

A fight between A. J. Thornton and C. E. Taylor and son, Branson Taylor, took place Friday morning in front of Taylor’s barn in the public highway just north of Graham.  It is said that the weapons used were an iron crowbar and a pitchfork.  thornton was quite badly hurt, having received several cuts and bruises about the face and head.  After the fight Thornton was taken to his home by Sam Eckles, a neighbor, and Drs. Rowlette and Findley were called and dressed the wounds.  Mr. Thornton is reported to be getting along as well as could be expected.

Thornton and Taylor own adjoining farms and it is said that the trouble grew out of a dispute over a division fence, and ill feeling had existed between them for some time.

This “division fence” was a hedge of long standing, whether it stood exactly on the line between the two farms or not, we do not know, perhaps it will take the services of the county surveyor to establish that point.

From what has been reported to us, it seems that Thornton’s men had been cutting some of this hedge for post, then Taylor, wanting to get his share, commenced cutting posts, when he received notice not to cut any more post until the line was established.

It also seems that on a part of this hedge was a hog tight wire fence, placed there by Taylor to keep Thornton’s hogs from off his premises.  Mr. Taylor removed this wire, and Mr. Thornton then went to the hardware, purchased more wire and had taken it to the farm to replace the wire removed by Taylor.  When Thornton, with his 11 year old son, was on his way back to town, the fight took place.

C. E. Taylor is one of the oldest citizens of Graham.  He owns a farm adjoining the town, and was for many years in the mercantile business in Graham, and is well known throughout this part of the county.  Branson is his son about 20 years old.  A. J. Thornton is a son-in-law and partner of A. C. Snyder, and is also well known in Graham and this part of the county.

The many friends of both parties deplore the fact that this trouble between the neighbors has arisen.

Deputy Sheriff George Evans arrested C. E. Taylor and son Saturday on an information issued by Prosecuting Attorney George Pat Wright, charging them with an assault with intent to kill.  The Taylors gave bond to appear at the June term of court.

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