Big Red Balloons for Milton William Sewell and Friends

From the July 20, 1922 Skidmore News (Skidmore, Missouri), page 1:

Milton William Sewell Entertained.

In response to the invitation issued last week by Milton William Sewell, about twenty-five little friends gathered at his home last Thursday afternoon to help him celebrate his seventh birthday. The children played all afternoon, after which they were served with ice cream cones, animal cookies and little cakes.  Before departing they were given big red balloons as favors.  They left declaring that they had had “an awful nice time” on Milton’s birthday.

Miss Maude Linville assisted Mrs. Sewell in entertaining.

The little folks present were:  Mary Lou Medsker, Irene Devers, Frances Littler, Doris Logan, Maxine Stevens, Velma Loucks, Joe and Randolph Manning, Norma Ruth Logan, Dorothy Littler, Jack Moorhead, Roland and John Jr. Bodle, Lois Barrett, Johnny Ashbrook, Wendal Donahue, Margaret Monk, Ralph Merritt, Edri Shell, Don Weddle, Ralph Riley, Delma Lee Shell, Levanne Laufman, Rebecca Taylor of Wilcox and the little host, Milton Sewell.

 

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Lake Contrary Chautauqua, 1901

We sometimes find ourselves at a time when it is most undesirable to work.  Oh, for the cooler shores of Lake Contrary and the refreshing words of a fine Chautauqua!  From the July 26, 1901 Skidmore Standard, page 1:

Lake Contrary Chautauqua at St. Joseph, July 21 to August 4.

We are in receipt of a program of the Second Annual Chautauqua which will be held at Lake Contrary, St. Joseph, from July 21 to August 4.

The date of the Chautauqua comes at a time when it is most undesirable to work and those who are figuring on taking a few days vacation will find Lake Contrary an ideal place to spend the time. A comparison of this year’s program with all others will show that it is far superior in every respect. Unsurpassed transportation facilities, ample accommodations, liberal rates and modern charges enable the man of family and limited means to enjoy the entire program on the same footing as the wealthy man, and make the Second Annual Chautauqua at Lake Contrary the most popular and desirable of all such gatherings.

There are twenty-seven speakers and lecturers on the program. All the principle lectures will be at 3:30 in the afternoon at the Lake Casino with the exceptions of William J. Bryan on July 31, Rabbi Hirsch on July 31, Bishop Arnett on July 28 and Bishop Cleary on the closing Sunday, August 4, which will be held in the ampitheatre.

Anyone desiring further information should write Palmer L. Clark, assistant secretary, St. Joseph, Mo.

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Jolly Picnic by a Jolly Crowd, 1909

Sunday School social news from the July 22, 1909 Skidmore New Era (Skidmore, Missouri), page 5:

A Jolly Picnic by a Jolly Crowd.

A jolly picnic was held by the Sunday school class Thursday, July 15, on the beautiful lawn of their teacher, C. E. Owens.  They were the merriest crowd of girls in this fair land of ours, and all came with well filled baskets at the noon hour, and a long table was spread to accommodate the guests.  Mr. and Mrs. John Owens had charge of this table and after the class of girls had partaken of the good things to eat, they had the honor of entertaining their superintendent, G. L. Owen.

Promptly at 3 o’clock J. O. Miller was on the ground with his fine “E. F. M.” car and all the girls were whisked away to the country for a nice long ride, which they enjoyed very much.  Mrs. F. H. Barrett and Mrs. J. O. Miller served the crowd with ice cream.

It was a jolly day by a jolly crowd and will be long remembered by all present.

 

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Skidmore Chautauqua, 1915

The 1915 planning committee for Skidmore, Missouri’s big Chautauqua had already appointed first, second, third, and fourth vice presidents, but if four vice presidents are good, adding another dozen or so must surely be better.  From the June 24, 1915 Skidmore New Era (Skidmore, Missouri), page 12:

Name Vice-Presidents.

At a meeting of the Skidmore Chautauqua management at headquarters last Monday night it was decided to appoint the clerk of each school district in the vicinity of Skidmore as a Vice-President of the Skidmore Chautauqua.  A meeting of these vice-presidents will be called at an early date. The following were appointed:

W. A. Argo, A. C. Barber, J. H. Murphy, Roy Cottrill, Link Hitchcock, Wm. Taylor, A. P. Logan, C. C. Lowrance, Jake Suetterlin, Claude Peters, E. L. Daken, C. D. Bailey, E. S. Hester, Wm. Mills, Clayton Appleman, W. G. Zeller, Hugh McDonald, and J. D. Tarpley.

At this meeting, they also decided to have “Home Coming Day” Saturday, July 17th.  Let all of us write our friends and relatives to come and enjoy an old fashioned reunion, it will do us good.

Castelucci's Italians Will Open The Chautauqua.  Our Chautauqua program will open with music, close with music and have music as a feature at both the afternoon and evening programs of each of the Chautauqua days.  The first of these Chautauqua musical attractions is Castelucci's Italians, the company that comes on the opening day.  They play all the instruments they have time to play in the hour and a half or so that is allotted to them and start the Chautauqua off with a considerable zest and enthusiasm which puts the patrons "on edge" for the several days of entertainment and good things that follow.  A Chautauqua committee always plans for strong Talent on the opening day of their several days' program, and in this insance, our committee has planned wisely.  It's the time for everyone to get together in a sort of a community get together spirit and to start the Chautauqua off in true Chautauqua style.  The company is one of the noted musical aggregations of the Chautauqua platform; a company that has appear4ed with astounding success throughout the country; they have extraordinary talent and versatility, they are alert to the finer tastes of the discriminating Chautauqua audience; and, altogether, it is such a company as you would regret seriously to have missed hearing.  Hear them on the opening day of the Chautauqua -- both afternoon and evening.

Castelucci’s Italians were the opening act of the Skidmore, Missouri Chautauqua in 1915. Advertisement from the June 24, 1915 Skidmore New Era, page 12.

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The Kilties Band, Dunstan’s Opera Singers, and Other Big Attractions

From the June 24, 1915 Skidmore New Era (Skidmore, Missouri), page 6:

Skidmore Chautauqua Begins Saturday, July 17th. Lasts Six Full Days. The Kilties Band, Dunstan's Opera Singers, John Merritte Driver and other Big Attractions to be Here.  The Tent Will be Pitched on The High School Grounds.  The Committee in charge of the Chautauqua is glad to announce that the program this year is one they feel sure will be of interest to every person in the community and we are anxious for a large attendance throughout the entire season.  The following men can supply you with season tickets and give any information about the Chautauqua:  J. O. Miller, J. C. Spahr, W. H. Welton, G. L. Owen, C. E. Owen, Reuben Barrett, W. J. Skidmore, H. W. Montgomery, A. C. Dodds and L. D. Jordan.  This Chautauqua invitation is extended to our friends and neighbors at Maitland, Graham, and Maryville and in fact, throughout the entire community.  A morning hour lecture will be conducted each week day by Mr. C. E. Booth.  Dr. J. M. Driver, Chautauqua Lecturer.  Dr. Driver is one of the best known Chautauqua lecturers in America.  A world citizen, he speaks with authority on questions of national and international scope.  He will appear the sixth day of the Chautauqua. Get Your Season Tickets Early.  Of course you know that it will be necessary for us to sell a good number of season tickets to make this Chautauqua a success.  We have agreed to do that.  Not a man of the Chautauqua committee expects any financial reward out of this enterprise.  This is not the idea.  Their reward is yours:  a good, clean Chautauqua program that all our people can enjoy and that will make this a better community to live in and do business in.  That's the whole thing about a Chautauqua: the enjoyment and the good we get out of it.  We want this invitation to include all the farmers in this whole section. You farmers, put aside some of your work and plan to take in this Chautauqua.  It will be well worth every cent and every minute you put into it.  And bring your families in and let them have a treat.  The cost of a season ticket is as small as we could make it and pay expenses.  It brings the cost down to a few cents for each attraction.  It is the least expensive form of entertainment in America, quality and high standard considered.  Everybody get behind this and make a big six days of it.  Remember, too, the Children's Chautauqua for the boys and girls.  Watch for later announcements of this.  We plan to make it a happy time for them.  Help us to do it; for the sake of your own boys and girls.  H. W. Montgomery, Secretary.  Phone or Write for Tickets and Particulars.  Chautauqua Begins Saturday, July 17.

One of many advertisements for the Skidmore Chautauqua (Skidmore, Missouri) in 1915.

Skidmore Chautauqua Begins Saturday, July 17th. Lasts Six Full Days.

The Kilties Band, Dunstan’s Opera Singers, John Merritte Driver and other Big Attractions to be Here.

The Tent Will be Pitched on The High School Grounds.

The Committee in charge of the Chautauqua is glad to announce that the program this year is one they feel sure will be of interest to every person in the community and we are anxious for a large attendance throughout the entire season.

The following men can supply you with season tickets and give any information about the Chautauqua:  J. O. Miller, J. C. Spahr, W. H. Welton, G. L. Owen, C. E. Owen, Reuben Barrett, W. J. Skidmore, H. W. Montgomery, A. C. Dodds and L. D. Jordan.

This Chautauqua invitation is extended to our friends and neighbors at Maitland, Graham, and Maryville and in fact, throughout the entire community.  A morning hour lecture will be conducted each week day by Mr. C. E. Booth.

Dr. J. M. Driver, Chautauqua Lecturer.  Dr. Driver is one of the best known Chautauqua lecturers in America.  A world citizen, he speaks with authority on questions of national and international scope.  He will appear the sixth day of the Chautauqua.

Get Your Season Tickets Early.

Of course you know that it will be necessary for us to sell a good number of season tickets to make this Chautauqua a success.  We have agreed to do that.  Not a man of the Chautauqua committee expects any financial reward out of this enterprise.  This is not the idea.  Their reward is yours:  a good, clean Chautauqua program that all our people can enjoy and that will make this a better community to live in and do business in.

That’s the whole thing about a Chautauqua: the enjoyment and the good we get out of it.

We want this invitation to include all the farmers in this whole section. You farmers, put aside some of your work and plan to take in this Chautauqua.  It will be well worth every cent and every minute you put into it.  And bring your families in and let them have a treat.

The cost of a season ticket is as small as we could make it and pay expenses.  It brings the cost down to a few cents for each attraction.  It is the least expensive form of entertainment in America, quality and high standard considered.

Everybody get behind this and make a big six days of it.

Remember, too, the Children’s Chautauqua for the boys and girls.  Watch for later announcements of this.  We plan to make it a happy time for them.  Help us to do it; for the sake of your own boys and girls.

H. W. Montgomery, Secretary.

Phone or Write for Tickets and Particulars.  Chautauqua Begins Saturday, July 17.

 

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You Have Earned a Vacation – Skidmore Chautauqua, 1915

You and your family have earned a vacation.  Sadly, you’ll have to make other plans, but if you were in Skidmore, Missouri in July 1915, you and your neighbors and friends would have been in for a treat.  (We must say that we have a difficult time imagining the Punkin Show as ever having been debasing, but we’ll have to trust the editor on that.)  From the June 24, 1915 Skidmore New Era, page 1:

Chautauqua

Only four more weeks and Skidmore will have her second annual Chautauqua.

Last year’s Chautauqua was a wonderful success in every way and speaks volumes for the moral status of our people.  Skidmore is noted throughout the state for several exceptional traits:  one is her insistence on maintaining the excellence of her schools, even to the point of paying the highest school tax in the state.

She has for years supported a very fine lecture course and now is a pioneer among towns of her size in having a Chautauqua.  Skidmore does nothing by halves, one reason is that everybody either pushes or pulls whenever a public enterprise is promoted.

We are all proud of Monroe township, her churches, her schools, her business men and her citizens, there are no better anywhere, that is why the Chautauqua is taking the place of our Street Fair or Pumpkin Show, because of the fact that the one is elevating while the other as it has degenerated in the last few years has been debasing.  Our people are given to see that it is poor business to pay attractions to come here that take away our money and our morals as well.

A visit to any Chautauqua will show you congregated there the men and women that do things worth while in their communities.  They are there because they know that they will come in contact with those that can aid them in doing better, bigger things next year than they have this, because they want their children to learn what the best men and women of our land are doing and how to do it.  Take our word for it you will not spend $2.00 this year that will bring you as wonderful returns as the $2.00 you spend for a season ticket to the Chautauqua.  You will not devote a week to as beneficial results as you will there. You and your family have earned a vacation.  Take it on the Chautauqua grounds surrounded by your neighbors and friends who are all doing the same thing.

 

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Skidmore Plans Chautauqua, 1915

If you want to ensure the success of your chautauqua, put the Ladies’ Auxiliary in charge of the reception.  From the June 3, 1915 Skidmore New Era (Skidmore, Missouri), page 1:

Skidmore Chautauqua

The Program is an Extra Strong One — Mass Meeting Held Tuesday Evening.

To Be Held July 17-22.

Much Interest Taken Especially Among the Farmers — Program and Advertising in Near Future.

A mass meeting was held at the Manchester & Dodds store Tuesday evening when arrangements were completed and officers elected for the chautauqua the ensuing year.

A representative of the Chautauqua Company that furnishes the talent was present and assured the people that this year the program was an extra strong one.  He had a list of the attractions that will appear here and it shows his statement is correct.

This year the chautauqua association will have a ladies’ auxiliary.  We have no comment to make on this further than to say that this insures the success of the chautauqua.  The ladies of Skidmore and surrounding territory should be deeply interested in the chautauqua movement as it is their children that will reap the benefits derived from a movement of this kind.

Following is a list of the officers elected:

Executive Committee:  W. H. Welton, President.  C. Wright, 1st Vice President.  Fred Barrett, 2nd Vice President.  J. L. Teson, 3rd Vice President. A. L. Oakerson, 4th Vice President.  H. W. Montgomery, Secretary.  R. B. Foster, Treasurer.

Ticket Committee:  Theo. Gray, Merv Gray, R. A. Walker, W. S. Linville, A. C. Dodds, Ira Porter, Bert Garnett, G. L. Owen, Rev. M. DeWitt and Rev. E. L. Cunningham.

Publicity Committee:  G. F. and J. F. Kellogg, Chairmen.  W. G. Reynolds, M. A. Sewell.

Grounds Committee:  L. D. Jordan, C. E. Owens, W. J. Skidmore.

Reception Committee:  The Ladies auxiliary as a whole.

 

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