The Democrats Return

High jinks and political activity ever did go together. As reported in the Standard, July 13, 1900:

The Democrats Return.

The evening passenger last Friday brought three happy Democrats home from Kansas City where they had been in attendance at the National Democratic Convention. E. E. Tilton, the Democratic nominee for sheriff of Nodaway county, was one, F. T. Russell was another and B. F. Martin was the third.

The smile which adorned Frank Russell’s face was truly a broad one – he had seen Bryan nominated; and he was so hoarse from excessive cheering that we doubt if his own hogs recognized his call when he arrived home.

Bob Martin, with his ever present pipe, had the appearance of a man who had really, actually and truly enjoyed himself. And by the way, that pipe caused Mr. Martin no little concern at one time while he was on this trip; he thought for one brief moment that he was the cause of bringing the whole fire fighting force of Kansas City out, and the quickness with which he “put out that pipe” was, we dare say, never equalled in all his life. At the particular time of which we speak, Mr. Martin was standing with the other Skidmore parties on one of the main thoroughfares of the city engaged in conversation. Mr. Martin was smoking as usual, and occasionally a few sparks would fly out from the bowl of his pipe. Suddenly up dashed a fire engine which wheeled in and stopped near the gentlemen.

“It’s your pipe, Bob! Your pipe!” yelled Mr. Tilton. Out of Mr. Martin’s mouth came the pipe and the fire was smothered in double quick time. Then he stood there a living monument of astonishment for about a minute; and until he saw that a slight blaze in the building immediately behind him was the cause of the fire laddies’ run.

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Mr. John German Stung by Bees

The front page of the July 13, 1900 Skidmore Standard was full of medical news. Mrs. B. W. Holt fell and suffered a severe break to her thumb. Mr. John German also encountered some bad luck:

Stung By Bees.

While John German was plowing corn Thursday he was dangerously stung by bees. He is renting part of the D. Ward King farm and was there when it happened. His little girl was riding on the cultivator and was stung several times.

The bees had swarmed on a hill of corn and were unnoticed until Mr. German plowed into them. He was stung in so many places that the poison sickened him and he could do nothing with the team which was stung so badly that it ran away. The horses became entangled in the harness but help nearby cared for them.

The poison had taken such effect on Mr. German that he could not sit up to be carried home. Blood was oozing out over his face while his head and body were swelled to immense proportions. Medical aid was called and he was soon out of danger and is now completely recovered. – Maitland Herald.

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The Triumph of All Sales

A “proclamation of practical economy” in the “triumph of all sales,” as advertised in the July 20, 1900 Skidmore Standard (Skidmore, Missouri):

Mid-Summer Mark-Down Sale of all kinds of summer goods.  The Triumph of All Sales.  A proclamation of practical economy.  The time has arrived to unload our stocks and make a clean sweep of every summer item in our store.  We do not go at it in a half-hearted way and reduce a few items here and there to tempt you.  But, we look at the situation squarely in the face.  We want to move all our stock and quickly; and we know there is not a greater power to do this to our satisfaction better than extraordinary low prices.  Another remarkable feature and one that you want to thoroughly appreciate, is the fact that these very extraordinary values are offered at a time when you can still get good service out of them.  Another great point you want to bear in mind is that every article in this sale was made for this summer's wear and is the best the market affords.  You can better appreciate the magnitude of this great value-giving sale by personally attending it, as prices printed in the papers now-a-days mean but little unless they are backed by solid merit. The prices we quote here, the real solid merit of our merchandise and our great reputation for reliability should be sufficient to convince you that we present an opportunity long to be remembered.  1-4 Off on all crash skirts, ladies shirt waists and children's crash suits.  Sumer clothing must go.  Big reductions on all kinds of crash skirtings and suitings, lawns, dimities, and everything in the summer line.  Sewell Bros. & Montgomery.  Store closed at 8:00 p.m. except on Saturday evenings.

From the July 20, 1900 Skidmore Standard (Skidmore, Missouri)

 

Mid-Summer Mark-Down Sale of all kinds of summer goods.  The Triumph of All Sales.  A proclamation of practical economy.

The time has arrived to unload our stocks and make a clean sweep of every summer item in our store.  We do not go at it in a half-hearted way and reduce a few items here and there to tempt you.  But, we look at the situation squarely in the face.  We want to move all our stock and quickly; and we know there is not a greater power to do this to our satisfaction better than extraordinary low prices.

Another remarkable feature and one that you want to thoroughly appreciate, is the fact that these very extraordinary values are offered at a time when you can still get good service out of them.

Another great point you want to bear in mind is that every article in this sale was made for this summer’s wear and is the best the market affords.

You can better appreciate the magnitude of this great value-giving sale by personally attending it, as prices printed in the papers now-a-days mean but little unless they are backed by solid merit.

The prices we quote here, the real solid merit of our merchandise and our great reputation for reliability should be sufficient to convince you that we present an opportunity long to be remembered.

1-4 Off on all crash skirts, ladies shirt waists and children’s crash suits.  Sumer clothing must go.  Big reductions on all kinds of crash skirtings and suitings, lawns, dimities, and everything in the summer line.

Sewell Bros. & Montgomery.  Store closed at 8:00 p.m. except on Saturday evenings.

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Patton-Peter Feud, 1902

We break from the usual news of business, agriculture, baseball and ice cream socials to bring you this startling news and an unusually long account from the July 11, 1902 Skidmore Standard.  Sounds like the heat got to everyone:

Shooting Scrape.

Jesse Patton Seriously Wounded by Gun Shot and Beat Over the Head With a Club.  Was Attacked by Five Men. Clubs, Hedge-Knives and Revolvers Used in the Fight.

Yesterday afternoon about three o’clock as Jesse Patton was coming to town, he was waylaid at the Peter’s corner, four miles east of town, by three Peter brothers.  He was accompanied by a boy by the name of Wampler.  Two of the Peter boys caught hold of the team while the third one tried to pull Patton out of the buggy. When the scuffling was going on, young Wampler had presence of mind enough to strike the team with the whip.  Upon being struck the team plunged forward, and breaking loose from the boys who held them came very near running over them.

Not to be outdone so easily the three Peter brothers, with two other brothers, hitched up and followed Patton to town with the avowed purpose, so it seams, of doing him personal harm.  They again made an assault on him in front of French & Co’s. hardware store.  When the second attack was made, Joseph T. Tate was with Patton, but Lee Peter, the oldest brother, persuaded Tate to look at the dangerous end of a cocked gun while the other brothers all commenced to beat Patton. Being too many for him, he backed into French & Co’s. hardware store and, getting hold of a hedge knife, he made his adversaries all flee for the door, ,but they were not satisfied and again went into the store after him.  he made them retreat a second time, and finding he was too much for them, they called to their brother, Lee, who had been holding Tate at bay.  Upon coming to their rescue a shot was heard and Jesse Patton sank to the floor.

Thinking, no doubt, that their work was accomplished each of the brothers who were not armed secured a hedge knife — a weapon they had found very effective — and, leaving the store, they crossed over to the north side of Elm street and walked down toward the railroad crossing where they had their team and horse — Lee rode a horse — hitched and left town.

But little attempt was made to arrest the Peter brothers at the time as everybody was so excited.  Constable Bodle got on a horse and overtook the parties, but being better equipped with shooting irons than he was, they convinced him that he would better reinforce before he took them, which he sensibly concluded to do.

A shot gun posse was soon made up and started after the boys.

Two of them were captured at their home, four miles east of town, and two on toward Maryville.  The oldest one, Lee, had gone on east on his horse.

During the fight Patton got in several effective blows on his assailants and one of them was cut very bad on the arm.

Patton was shot in the back about the lower rib, the ball ranging down and forward.

Joe Tate, in trying to prevent the trouble, was beaten over the head and knocked down and came very near being shot.

The trouble first started last winter when one of the Peter boys made an uncomplimentary remark within the hearing of a girl that Patton was with.  He afterward apologized to the lady but Patton was not satisfied and caught him one night and gave him a good threshing.  From that time the trouble has been getting worse but no overt acts have been done until yesterday.

At such a time as this when everybody is very much excited it is very difficult to get all the particulars, but we have tried to give the facts as best we could get them.

Up to going to press Lee Peter had not been apprehended.

Later.

Patton was taken to the St. Francis hospital, at Maryville Tuesday evening and an operation performed, and the bullet extracted.  The wound, which at first was thought to be fatal, is not a serious one, as the bullet struck a bone and curved around the body instead of penetrating the stomach as was at first thought.

He stood the operation well and at latest accounts is doing nicely.

Claude Peter, the one who was cut on the arm, will probably have a stiff arm at the elbow as in dressing the wound a portion of one of the bones had to be taken out.  After having his wounds dressed he was taken to the home of his uncle at Maryville.

Four of the Peter boys, Russ, Elbridge, Claude and Rhue, were arrested Tuesday evening and waived the preliminary examination.  Judge Johnson fixed their bonds at $1000 each.  Their trial is set for July 21.

Lee Peter has not been heard of.  The last seen of him he was going east from the Peters farm.

 

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Scaldy Ashbrook and the Skidmore Boys Meet the Maryville All Stars

An epic ball game was reported in the July 1, 1909 Skidmore New Era (Skidmore, Missouri), page 7:

Ball Game at Maryville, Friday.

The ball game Friday between Skidmore and the All Stars of Maryville, on the Maryville grounds, doesn’t look very good to our boys on the score book, as the game resulted in a 10 to 1 score in favor of the Maryville team.

The Skidmore battery was “hoodoed” for some reason, Moorehead who was catching being spiked behind the left ear in colliding with a Maryville runner in the second inning, and Weddle, who was in the box and has considerable reputation as a twirler whose curves are mighty hard to hit, seemed to be “up in the air,” and the Maryville ites batted him all over the field.

At the end of the second inning a change of battery was made by Ashbrook, captain of the Skidmore Club, entering the box, and Spahr taking the position behind the bat and things looked different.  It was another game altogether.  The Maryville Tribune in speaking of the game said:  The Skidmore captain relieved the battery in the third inning and after that Funk’s men got only one score, and that was in the seventh.  “Scaldy” Ashbrook twirled the last seven innings for the visitors and the old war horse showed some class and inspired his following to tighten up and get busy.

The Skidmore boys scored one in the seventh, making as many as the All Stars, notwithstanding that one of our players was smeared with blood from his scalp wound and all of them had lost confidence from the results of the first two innings.

Those who witnessed the game say the last seven innings were fast ball.  A game was matched between practically the same teams on the Skidmore grounds for Wednesday.

 

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Dr. F. A. Lee Goes West, 1909

Sounds like quite a trip.  From the Skidmore New Era (Skidmore, Missouri), July 1, 1909, p. 4:

Dr. F. A. Lee Goes West.

Dr. F. A. Lee left Thursday morning for a six weeks trip in the West.  He goes from here to Kingsley, Kansas, where he has a farm and will stop off there to make some improvements, and Mrs. Lee, who will leave here about a week later, will join him, and they will go from there to Yellowstone National Park, the Alaska Yukon Pacific Exposition and all the principal cities of the coast.  Dr. Wyman, of Maitland, will attend his patients while he is gone.

 

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