Close Call for the Improvement Association

Pity the poor Skidmore Improvement Association. It was August.  It was hot.  Everyone was busy, and the Skidmore Standard had spent its previous couple of issues prodding the Association to take on various projects. It is always easier to criticize someone else than it is to take action, and the editor seemed inclined to sit back and criticize while the ladies of Skidmore did the laundry, cooked the meals, tended the garden, raised the children, sewed the clothing, cleaned the houses, and somehow couldn’t find the time to fix the town.  Fancy that.

From the still-grouchy August 10, 1900 edition of the Skidmore Standard, page 1:

A Bit of Life Yet Remaining.
Skidmore Improvement Association Has Close Call.

 

There was one officer and a half dozen members at the meeting of the Skidmore Improvement Association Tuesday afternoon. No business was transacted. The ladies present, waited and wondered why other members did not come, and at last settled down to a pleasant neighborly chat.

 

In as much as this meeting was specially called to determine how much latent interest there might be in the Association, the turn-out Tuesday afternoon was discouraging in the extreme. One lady, who had always taken a very active part, felt bad about it and told the Standard reporter to write up an obituary for the Association.

 

But, in the face of the belief that “the good die young” – and there is no denying that the Skidmore Improvement Association is both young and good – we believe that it is not dead; but only sleepeth.

 

Tuesday was one of those hottest days of the summer. The very thought of having to dress and walk several blocks even to a meeting of the Skidmore Improvement Association – was enough to spoil the umor of any but the very sweetest tempered ladies in town. It isn’t any wonder then that only a few members were present.

 

The Standard is disposed to give the ladies another opportunity to prove their interest in their homes and in the improvement of Skidmore. When the weather cools somewhat and we can feel that life is worth the living, then if the ladies do not do something, we are ready to write the obituary and enclose it in column rules turned up-side down.