Do Your Duty

The editor of the Skidmore Standard seldom waded into politics within the pages of the newspaper, but he set aside that rule a few times in 1900.  Here he is in the March 30, 1900 edition with some political advice our modern world often seems to have conveniently forgotten:

Do Your Duty After You Vote.

Remember the village board indicates the kind of people a town is composed of. The duty of a citizen has only begun when he has voted for an official. An officer is like the people who elect him. If he does not do his duty, it is because the people did not want him to, or they would not have elected him.

If town ordinances have been violated or evaded in the past, it was because the people elected officers that could not prevent it, had they tried, because the people did not try to help them.

So when you vote next Tuesday, vote with the intention of helping those who are elected to execute the laws, and you will find that the town will have the best set of officers the coming year, that we have ever had.

If we don’t get the President that we vote for we are satisfied and do our part to help the world anyway, so why not do the same when we elect town officers. Elect them, stand by them and you will not complain so much that they are not doing their duty.

Usually the people evade the laws instead of officials.