Letters Home: Frank Jenkins

The Skidmore News published the following update from soldier Francis Jenkins in its November 22, 1917 edition:

From Frank Jenkins

Boston, Mass., Nov. 11, 1917
Skidmore News,
Dear Sir, I will write and tell you about my trip from Charleston, S.C. to Boston, Mass.

We left Charleston Friday evening at six forty-five, p.m. and we arrived in Washington, D.C. at ten twenty a.m. Saturday morning.

We got our dinner here before we left at eleven o’clock, a.m.  I noticed out of Washington always that there was a large training camp for soldiers and between Washington and Baltimore there was another training camp, and some of the soldier boys that belong in this camp got on the train that we were on and I was talking to one of them and he said that there were forty-five thousand of them at the camp.  He said they were all conscripted men.

We arrived in Baltimore, Maryland at twelve thirty.  We went through the state of Delaware and we went through Trenton, J.J. and Philadelphia, Pa., arriving in Philadelphia at three forty p.m.  They pulled us the rest of the way into New York City with an electric engine.  We went through a long tunnel at New York City at four o’clock p.m.

When we left Washington we got on a fast train to New York and we beat our baggage in New York three hours.  The train the baggage was on was three hours late, we were supposed to leave New York at five five p.m., but waited for our baggage, so we got our suppers and after supper we started out to see New York City on foot.  We took in two shows and left at twelve thirty, a.m. for Boston.  We arrived in Boston at seven five.

This morning we ate our breakfast here and after breakfast we took a street car for Cambridge.  We went there and reported to the commanding officer, he told us he would fix us up tomorrow.  He told us to go on liberty and we beat it back to Boston.

There are two thousand radio men going to school at Cambridge.  I was talking to a C.P.V. this morning and he said they fed us good here.  We will be detailed to a working party this week as each man gets a week of guard duty and the second week we are here we go to school.

They have school three nights one week and two nights the next week.  Their day school is from eight to twelve a.m. and from one to four p.m.  They drill from four till six and have night school from seven till nine; we have cots to sleep on.

Have not been assigned to a company yet so I don’t know what my address will be.

Yours truly,
Francis M. Jenkins