Skidmore Graduates Largest Class, 1916

Most of the graduation ceremonies are over in our neck of the woods, but we thought you might like to celebrate alongside Skidmore, Missouri in its 1916 graduating class.  From the Skidmore News, May 25, 1925, page 1:

Skidmore Graduates Largest Class.

The senior class graduation exercises were held in the opera house last Friday evening.  The following pupils received their diplomas:

Rollo Ralph Howden, Ada Ruth McDowell, Lettie Mae Rodman, Hildred Blanch Goslee, Elta Mae Taylor, Delma Josephine Albright, Meredeth Opal Stevens, Mary Ellen Barrett, Freda Gertrude Peoples, Mildred Cora Brown, Stella Mae Steph, Ada Grace Sauceman, William Byron Owen, Glynn Artnie Britton, Hazel Elizabeth Teson.

Dr. Robert E. Goodrich of St. Joseph was the principal speaker and his lecture was one of wholesome thought, and should long be remembered by the people of Skidmore.

In addition to the prize awarded to Rollo Howden, Miss Ruth McDowell was given a $75.00 scholarship to Stephens College, Columbia, Mo., and Miss Lettie Rodman received a one-year course in the State Normal at Maryville, Mo.

While it is the largest class ever graduated from the school, it is also one of the biggest-hearted classes that ever finished at the school. They are A1 — every one of them.  They are an optimistic, hopeful, ever-looking-at-the-bright-side-of-life bunch.

When they left school it was sure a lively set that had gone.  Young people should rank in their class not because they made higher grades than their classmates, but traits of character should be considered.  How kind, how many smiles and what kind of an attitude was put into the school work — these things go into life.  Why shouldn’t they count at school just as much as English, mathematics or any study?

Rollo Howden, Ruth McDowell and Lettie Rodman were the ranking members of the class, but several others were very close to them.  Lettie Rodman for the past two years has had perfect attendance. That is a good record, but when you think of perfect attendance throughout the entire twelve years of school it is remarkable and it being made by a boy makes it still more so — that boy is Rollo Howden.

Our boys and girls are the greatest asset that we have.  That’s why we raise more corn to feed more cattle to sell for more money in order that we may be more able to better the condition of our young people.  What is a home without young people?  Worse still, what is a town without them?  If you don’t better the conditions of these young people you have missed the plan of life. How are you living about them?  Do you give them the correct lesson by your actions?  Do you think that you have the best home influence for them to live in?  If not, why don’t you make it so?  Is the “air” of these streets the best for your boys and girls? Is that school house on the hill the best that you can afford for them?

These questions should be answered by all true-minded parents.  With the beautiful resources that God has given these northwest Missouri people there shouldn’t be anything too good for their young people.

A number of the class will enter college this fall.