Two Trains of Cattle

Most of us today do not think about how our food is grown or about the effort that goes into raising it.  Things were a bit clearer to Skidmore’s citizens in 1899, and the November 11, 1899 Skidmore Standard illustrates this with some timely livestock news.

The week before, the paper announced:

William Freece received a telegram from T. B. Slaughter, Thursday morning, stating that he is on the road with 1,200 cattle and would probably arrive in Skidmore, today. Mr. Slaughter has been absent several months and bought his cattle in Colorado, New Mexico and Arizona.

The front page on November 11 included the following:

Two Trains of Cattle
T. B. Slaughter arrived in Skidmore last Friday evening with his large drove of western cattle. One train came in about five o’clock and the second train followed about an hour later. There were 25 cars in all, containing 1,020 cattle. This is the largest number of cattle ever received by any one man at this point. The freight alone amounted to a small fortune – over $4,000. Mr. Slaughter has the cattle in his feed lots and will prepare them for the market.